LGR – Scud Attack – DOS PC Game Review

LGR – Scud Attack – DOS PC Game Review


[typing] [whoosh] [siren blaring] [explosion] [echoing male voice]
Scud Attack! LGR: Ha ha! We’re getting attacked by scuds. That’s a major problem if you are… a person or any living thing. This is Scud Attack. From around 1998, I guess, by PLBM Games or as I always called it
when I was younger, Ppplllbbmm. There is no easy way to
pronounce this company’s name. And I never knew what it stood for. Pancakes Love Bloody Marbles. Pimple-Licking Beef Magnets. Who knows? All I know is that it was
a company by one dude. One awesome guy who put out tons of shareware
back in the ’90s and early 2000s for PCs as well as Palm OS later. And that is Kurt Dekker. This is notable because it was way
past the prime of shareware for MS-DOS. So it was pretty cool to still see
somebody making this stuff and putting it out for free, and also having some
commercial software as well. Mr. Dekker made a ton of games
back when he was making games like Island Hopper, Submarine Fury, Ack-Ack Attack, Hyper Tank! But of course, what we’re
gonna be looking at here is probably my favorite, at least of those that I have played, and that is… [echoing male voice]
Scud Attack! I like that cheesy announcer. He always was, in my mind, the same exact announcer
that was in One Must Fall 2097 at the beginning of the match. [echoing male voice]
Round One. Fight! Hmm, maybe he is. Maybe this is the aftermath of
the robot arena battles in 2097. Who knows, who cares? This is a Missile Command clone using VGA graphics, Sound Blaster sound and… computers. Yes, you need a computer to play this computer game. The idea behind the game is super simple. If you played Missile Command, the idea is to command your missiles. Much like a session of
impromptu stage acting, there are lines coming at you constantly. These lines are composed of scud missiles. Very scary Soviet-era stuff. And it is your job to defend your cities along the bottom of the screen with your own missiles. Your anti-ballistic, Patriot missile batteries. You have three along the bottom of the screen, One in the left,
the right and the middle. You can control the game with a keyboard, but that is for stupid
people without a mouse. Who doesn’t have a mouse? Mouse users, which is everyone, use the mouse to control the game. Each mouse button does
the exact same thing. It just shoots whichever
missile happens to be closest to the incoming scud missiles. In the arcade original, you could
control which missile you fire. This just does it automatically. You can actually use the 1, 2
and 3 keys on your keyboard for more strategic effectiveness. But I usually just click because it’s easier and I’m pretty lazy when
I’m playing this game. If a missile happens to
get past your defenses, chances are it will nuke one of your cities or even one of your own missile defenses, which leaves you defense-less. There’s a chance that it
will not hit anything at all, but such a chance is not very high. Of course, the point is to
last as long as possible, gaining the highest score as possible. And if you lose some
cities along the way, you can actually get additional cities for every 10,000 points that you earn. Once you lose all your cities, it is just like Missile Command. Incredibly depressing and everything blows up. And keeps blowing up. [explosion] And still blows up for a while. [explosion] Okay. Okay, seriously, that’s enough. That’s… [explosion] Okay, that’s enough! All–all right. Yeah, that’s good. You can input your name into the
high score table and play again. And again and again and again. And that is what this is. A game that you play repeatedly. If you want to. If you don’t, then that’s just okay because this is one of those
that you just come back to maybe every so often and just say, hey, I would like to defend my… cities. Against missiles. With missiles. It’s no Missile Command. It just doesn’t compare to the
arcade original, in my opinion for a few reasons. It doesn’t have quite as much
crap flying around on the screen. It’s not quite as frantic,
not quite as smooth. But that’s okay. For a shareware DOS game
made by one dude in his spare time, it’s well done and I can appreciate that. I had only played it on
the Atari 2600 at that point and this is a lot better than
that version, in my opinion. So… it was awesome. I liked it. You can find this game pretty
easily just searching Google. In fact, it’s made freeware now. Ever since March of 2007, Kurt Dekker made all of his old DOS games freeware. So just look around. I’ll probably put a link
in the video description for a current version of the full game. Although it’s worth noting
this isn’t the only DOS game named Scud Attack. There was actually one in
1991 by David Lee Peterson. It… pretty much sucks. Really, it’s not any good. It’s barely anything at all
like Missile Command. Its sequel, Scud Atak 2, from 1993 was pretty awesome, though. It had much, much more in common
with the arcade Missile Command game. Although it’s still a bit slow, uh, clunky, compared to Scud Attack. So, I would recommend
Scud Attack over Scud Atak because Scud Attack
is just a better game. Of course, I would recommend Missile
Command over any of these, but that’s just… That’s getting obvious, and more obvious than
being obvious at the moment. Which is what I am doing. And I am rambling, so I’m going
to stop this review right here. Scud Attack from Pppbbllmm games. It’s an awesome… game. That has nothing to do with potatoes. [explosions]

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